Easy, Fun, and Cute Art Projects Your Kids Can Do for Valentine’s Day

Do you observe Valentine’s Day in your family? I keep on saying that we don’t but I always seem to have Valentine-related activities for the kids to work on when the day comes around. I also make sure to give a little something, usually just candy and a homemade card, so I don’t really understand why I insist we don’t. Maybe it’s because my dad taught us not to and because, where it should normally count, we really don’t. My husband and I like to mouth off about presents and dates, but we don’t officially do anything. It’s just something that we agreed not to do.

Arguably, he did buy me mulberry and strawberry seedlings and a new saucepan, so there’s that. It’s not quite roses and chocolates, but if I had to choose my present, I’d choose live plants and something I can use a lot over the traditional flowers and sweets (although sweets will ALWAYS be eagerly received with wide open arms). I’d told him before not to get me bought cut flowers because I feel bad about throwing them away when they’re all wilted and dried. I could store them, but I already have more than a decade worth of dried bouquets turned into potpourri in our small home.

Besides jesting about presents and dates, we don’t greet each other “Happy Valentine’s Day” or treat the day any differently.

On that note, though, I’d also made it my mission to celebrate each day with my kids and find special things to do daily. If we observe silly “holidays” like Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day, then why not Valentine’s, right? It’s just for fun, so for homeschool, I naturally have to include arts and crafts activities that involve hearts. Lots of them.

I have three kids who are quite far apart in age: 10, 5, and 2. I could think of something that they could all work on together, but I can appreciate that my eldest would prefer the freedom of working on a project all by herself. She wouldn’t have to sacrifice quality to indulge her brothers. And she can use all kinds of materials without having to worry about somebody getting hurt or something getting swallowed.

For my two-year-old, here’s what we did. His contribution includes rubbing the glue stick inside the heart and sticking the pieces of construction paper onto the heart. I guided his hand through most of that, plus the writing of his name.

Sawyer's Valentine Artwork

With my five-year-old, he cut some, but mostly glued. We traced his hand for the trunk, btw. Cameron's Valentine Tree

My ten-year-old did all this. I just came up with the suggestion. 🙂

Marguerite's Stuffed Felt Hearts

This one isn’t really a homeschool project, but it’s still pretty crafty, so I’ll include it. I just made pillow boxes using cardstock, and then put inside some chocolates their grandmother sent over from Switzerland. I just winged it with the pattern, but you can easily find printable templates online.

Pillow Boxes with Candy

Did you get crafty this Valentine’s? What did you make? How did you celebrate? Share in the comments.

You Might Be A Kindred Spirit To Anne Shirley If…

Did you grow up reading the Anne of Green Gables books? Did you become obsessed with Anne Shirley and wish to be her best friend? Did you feel as though you had many similarities with her? Were you convinced that she would have recognized you for a kindred spirit if she had met you? You might be right if…

1. You can never call a body of water just by its name (lake = shining waters). You use a poetic turn of phrase for everything because that just makes it more interesting or more properly conveys just how interesting whatever it may be is.
2. You love big words and feel joy and rightness in using them. You’ve felt others’ scorn toward this propensity of yours, but that’s how you enjoy language, so they can just like it or lump it.
3. You’re forever in despair over your hair. Anne may have lamented hers its color, but you could complain over any number of other features. Try texture, density, and shape (somebody must hate her coarse, frizzy, MUTANT hair). Because you can’t stand your hair, you might have tried to alter it to disastrous results (not quite green hair, but the outcome is still highly unpleasant).
4. You read books like they’re going out of style. They’re your most cherished material possessions. You’ve failed to do important tasks because you just couldn’t put a book down.
5. You write novel-length letters. You probably spend a small fortune on postage stamps. Some people may have delayed reading your letter because it required too much commitment.
6. You daydream like your life depends on it. You believe indulging in fancies is enriching to the soul – totally not a waste of time.
7. You speak and write with a lot of asides. You consistently go off on a tangent, but piously returns to the original point.
8. You have a genius for getting into trouble. Good ideas tend to turn traitor on you, but that doesn’t stop you from jumping in with both feet the next time you get another.
9. You don’t hide your passion for unpopular interests, even if you’re teased for it. Even if you get to be known as the girl who namedrops characters from the Anne of Green Gables series as though they were her peeps and quotes lines from the books ad nauseam. In modern times, the term “dork” may have been employed.
10. You wonder about the most prosaic things and have been told on more than one occasion that nobody gives a flying fig.
11. And finally, you keep going on and on about your kindred spirits and appreciate the heck out of people you’ve discerned to belong to the race that knows Joseph because as Captain Jim pointed out, they’re the salt of the earth. Meeting a kindred soul is like hitting the mother lode. It’s a relief and a delight to find somebody who gets you. Thankfully, as you grow up, you learn that “Kindred spirits are not so scarce as I used to think. It’s splendid to find out there are so many of them in the world.

Is this true for you? Do you feel heartened to learn that so many people share your love of Anne Shirley? Can you be a candidate to be Anne Shirley’s bosom friend? And do you have anything to add to the list? Comment your thoughts below.

If you haven’t read the books yet or don’t have your own copy, you can buy a Kindle version of the eight-book collection for just $0.99 (about Php50). There’s nothing like cozying up with a traditional book and flipping through paper pages, but if the stories are what you’re after, the ebooks work just fine. And, yes, the following is an affiliate link.

How You Get More from Doodling

Zentangle Our Lemonade Days

I don’t know how things work in classrooms now with all the technology available. Do students still use notebooks or do they just record the lecture in their mobile devices? Hmm, I wouldn’t like that at all. When I was teaching, I didn’t allow my students to have their phones, ipods, or laptops out, except for very few and select instances. Gadgets weren’t as rampantly used back then, so I didn’t want some students to have an unfair advantage over the others by using one.

Since I homeschool my kids, they can’t clue me in either on what learning in a traditional classroom is like these days. In our eclectic homeschool setup, my daughter doesn’t have to take down notes. She does copywork, but she doesn’t note down important details when I’m explaining things to her. I think that’s a pity because I’ve found note-taking to be a very beneficial skill.

I was great at taking down notes. Classmates were forever borrowing mine to photocopy back in the day. They were practically written in shorthand, but were mostly legible, so the borrowers patiently put up with my penmanship.

I do have a nice cursive, if I do say so myself, but it’s hard to maintain it when you’re trying to catch and jot down all the salient points that the teacher is saying.

My chicken scratch wasn’t the only thing they had to deal with when using copies of my notes. I doodled in between actual note-taking, so they were treated to a lot of swirls, flowers, butterflies, paisley patterns, and Spencerian script practice lettering along the margin.

Doodling was frowned upon in my school. Notebooks were to stay neat. Also, I suppose if you were supposed to be listening to the teacher and taking down notes, but were doodling instead, it would seem as though you were being inattentive.

Doodling advocate Sunni Brown, however, proposes that the activity is more than just mindless drawing. She says it’s deep-thinking in disguise and is an effective problem-solving tool. There is also research that indicates that doodling actually aids memory retention.

Now, I may not have an eidetic memory, but I was the kind of student who remembered what she learned in class. If I had been paying attention, I would have been taking notes and doodling. Even if I never got around to reviewing my notes, I would still do well in tests.

Outside the classroom, doodling often helped me pass the time. I don’t have any remarkable drawing skills, but I have to admit liking the results of my doodling, which tended to look psychedelic. I had the habit of starting from a simple shape and then building up from that. You could tell that I was partial to swirls, polka dots, and paisleys. That was my natural doodling style. It was certainly a surprise to me to learn that there was a name for it: Zentangle®.

Described to be a purposeful and structured style of drawing similar to doodling, Zentangle® supposedly supports a mindful state of being (as opposed to mindless doodling). It is said to be a meditative art form that promotes relaxation and stress-reduction as well as improves mood and self-control.

Like my doodles, Zentangle® consists of repetitive patterns of straight lines, dots, curves, and shading. The Zentangler is allowed to be as creative and free-form in her use of these patterns.

I looked at examples of Zentangle® images and, wow, there are really gifted Zentanglers out there. A lot of the pieces I’ve seen are really intricate. Some people are even selling their creations.

My own doodles are pretty simple, and like I said, I’m not really particularly gifted when it comes to drawing, but I can come up with a pretty picture from putting together patterns of simple swirls, dots, and lines – nothing that anybody would want to pay money for, but the satisfaction derived from the creation process and the pleasure from the result make pretty good compensation as well.

I don’t know about traditional schools, but doodling totally passes as an art lesson in our home school. I introduced the concept of Zentangle® to my daughter and now she enjoys putting together easy patterns, usually inside alphabet letters. I’m grateful that she finds it engaging and that I can include it in my list of suggestions for replying to declarations of boredom. Also, she likes to include drawings and small craft projects in her letters to her pen pals, so for the next batch of mail, she’ll be enclosing their names done in Zentangle®.

Zentangle Midge

I think most people would cotton to the activity. It is simple, creative, and soothing. If your feelings are in some kind of turmoil, you might want to try some aimless zentangling and see if you’ll calm down. You can check out this Pinterest board for some easy patterns to get you started.

There’s obviously more to doodling than meets the eye. Are you a chronic and pathological doodler like me? What’s your doodling style? Have you tried zentangling before? Did you find it enjoyable? Go ahead and share photos of your efforts.

Are You a “Look at the Moon” Kind of Person?

View of Moon from Kombi

Somebody recently tagged me on an image shared on Facebook. It mainly had the text, “I’m such a ‘Look at the moon’ kind of person.” She was probably alluding to that time I urged people to take the time to look at the full moon. It was really big, round, and bright that night.

I was certain that there were people who were kindred and would appreciate a beautiful moon like I did. In Anne of Green Gables-speak, we’d all belong to the race that knows Joseph. I suppose that would be the race that got excited over seeing Venus in the sky even if it’s pretty much there every night, that flipped over the promise of a meteor shower, that noted down all the predicted celestial events in her planner…

In any case, if you’re a backyard astronomer like me (that’s an astronomy enthusiast who’s too busy, too tied down, or too lazy to properly pursue the interest – I’m all three. I’m a backyard birdwatcher too, btw.), you might be interested in noting down the following dates. This list is not the most detailed. It’s basically just the dates and the corresponding celestial body or bodies of interest. Check out this 2017 astronomy calendar for a more comprehensive list.

I’m skipping January since it’s over.

February
• 11 – Snow moon/penumbral lunar eclipse/New Year comet
• 26 – New moon/annular solar eclipse
March
• 12 – Full moon
April
• 1 – Mercury after sunset
• 7 – Jupiter at opposition (note four moons with strong binoculars)
• 11 – Full moon
• 22-23 – Lyrids meteor shower
May
• 6-7 – Eta Aquarids meteor shower
• 10 – Full moon
• 17 – Mercury before sunrise
June
• 3 – Venus before sunrise
• 9 – Full moon
• 15 – Saturn at opposition (note ring and moons with strong bins)
July
• 9 – Full moon
• 28-29 – Delta Aquarids meteor shower
• 30 – Mercury after sunset
August
• 7 – Full moon/partial lunar eclipse
• 12-13 – Perseids meteor shower
• 21 – Total solar eclipse
September
• 5 – Neptune at opposition (tiny blue dot with strong telescope)
• 6 – Full moon
• 12 – Mercury before sunrise
October
• 5 – Full moon
• 7 – Draconids meteor shower
• 19 – Uranus at opposition (tiny blue-green dot with strong telescope)
• 21-22 – Orionids meteor shower
November
• 4 – Full moon
• 4-5 – Taurids meteor shower
• 13 – Venus and Jupiter conjunction before sunrise
• 17-18 – Leonids meteor shower
• 24 – Mercury after sunset
December
• 3 – Supermoon
• 13-14 – Geminids meteor shower
• 21-22 – Ursids meteor shower

* I didn’t limit the list to only those that are visible in Southeast Asia, so you may want to confirm the hemisphere/s in which they’re supposed to manifest.

The way I obsessively track full moons, you’d think I shifted into a she-wolf or something. Nothing so supernatural. Like somebody implied, I’m just a “Look at the moon’ kind of person. Although you should probably expect me to act crazier than usual on these nights – but only because I get excited over a pretty moon. 😀

And shooting stars! That night in college when a bunch of us UP French Club folks were treated to a plethora of shooting stars while we were hanging out at the roof deck of one of our alumni is one of my fondest memories from that time. Alongside that time when I walked out of my husband’s (then-boyfriend) house and the whole yard was twinkling with fireflies. I’ll have to write about fireflies too…

Okay, now, I’m just geeking out, so I’ll go back to the original topic.

Are celestial events of interest to you? Have you gone past the backyard to pursue the hobby? I might have to and you can find out the reason by reading this blog post. Are you another kind of backyard enthusiast? Let me know. 🙂

Three Fun Ways to Celebrate Crêpe Day

One of our homeschool quirks is that we like to learn about and celebrate silly or obscure holidays. For February 2, we had several options. Groundhog Day, Crêpe Day, Dogsled Day, and Play Your Ukelele Day are just some that I can recall from the list I consulted.

Groundhog Day and Dogsled Day weren’t very relevant to us since we live in the tropics (although we still discussed Groundhog Day to satisfy the kids’ curiosity). We don’t have a ukulele for the moment so we couldn’t play one even if it was just the kind of holiday we’d have liked to observe. Crêpes, on the other hand, are something we enjoy eating, and I had several ideas for expanding on this occasion.

Crêpe Day, as you can probably guess, originates from France, a part of the La Fête de la Chandeleur or Candlemas. Now, I’m not Catholic, so I’m not the person to ask if it’s also celebrated here or elsewhere. Supposedly, however, it commemorates the day when Jesus was presented at the temple in Jerusalem.

There must have been some sort of Christian-pagan fusion in the celebration since the crêpes were mainly associated with the time of the year. They were made to use up the extra wheat before the next harvest. They also were supposed to look like the sun, so making them was a kind of salute to the coming warmer season.

At any rate, you gotta eat crêpes on Crêpe Day. That’s the part of the celebration we were all looking forward to, but we could definitely make other parts of the celebration fun and engaging too. Here are some of the activities we had on Crêpe Day that made it even more fascinating for us.

1. Learning French Chandeleur proverbs – I’m a confessed Francophile, so I love any old excuse to spout off French sayings. My eldest who’s 10 can already appreciate the beauty of the language, and while we’re officially studying Spanish and not French, it’s still fun to expose her to the latter. Here are two of the easier ones to remember:

À la Chandeleur, l’hiver cesse ou reprend vigueur.
On Candlemas, winter ends or strengthens.

Chandeleur couverte, quarante jours de perte.
Candlemas covered (in snow), forty days lost.

2. Flipping crêpes – There’s a French crêpe-throwing game that sounded fun, but it also sounded like a potential waste of good food, and since we avoid doing that as much as we can, I decided to come up with an alternative. Flipping crêpes is even more fun than flipping pancakes since they’re thinner and lighter, yet wider. The kids basically had a go at just one crêpe, holding the spatula over the table, so even if they missed (and they did several times), it still wouldn’t get dirty.

3. Coming up with a signature crêpe – We concocted our own crêpe filling. We didn’t have a lot of time by the time we got around to this. We also didn’t have much in the way of ingredients, so we stuck to the common options. Next time, I’ll prepare better and supply them with a variety of food items. These are what we came up with.

Banana with Nutella

Banana and Nutella on Crepe  Homemade Banana Nutella Crepe

Ham and Cheddar Cheese

Ham and Cheddar on Crepe
Homemade Ham and Cheddar Crepe

This is the recipe I followed for making the crêpes themselves.

Basic Crêpes

Ingredients
• 1 C all-purpose flour
• 2 eggs
• ½ C milk
• ½ C water
• Pinch of salt
• 2 T melted butter

Directions
• Whisk flour and eggs together in a large mixing bowl. Add in milk and water gradually, stirring until well-combined. Beat in salt and butter until smooth.
• Heat a lightly oiled frying pan over medium high heat. Pour about a fourth or a fifth of the batter on the pan, depending on how big your pan is. Tilt the pan in a circular motion, taking care to evenly coat the pan’s surface.
• Let the crêpe cook for one to two minutes until you can easily loosen it from the pan. Turn it over and cook until the bottom side is light brown.

If you’re interested in learning about fun holidays and observances, try checking out Brownielocks.com. Here’s the list for the month of February.

Do you like crêpes at all? Which kind is your favorite? Would you consider observing Crêpe Day next year? The above suggestions will hopefully give you a good idea of where to start. What other ideas would you recommend to observe this holiday? Would your rather celebrate Pancake Day (Shrove Tuesday, which falls on February 28 this year) instead of Crêpe Day? Let me know.

And remember that it doesn’t have to be Crêpe Day for you to get your crêpe on. You can have fun with crêpes anytime you want to.

Summer Fun: Colored Bubble Bath

blue and yellow bubble bathSince summer began, Marguerite has been having bubble baths about twice a week. She’d have one everyday if given the choice, but we don’t want to use up so much water. Anyway, now that it’s May, bubble baths are getting old, so to make them more fun, I looked for a way to make the bubbles purple (her favorite color). One blog suggested liquid water color (we only had the cake kind), and another suggested powdered tempera paint (we ran out and only had the liquid kind to begin with). I thought of food coloring and tried it out on the bubbles before telling Marguerite about it. Unfortunately, we didn’t have purple or red (which I could have mixed up with blue), so I had to make do with what was there. I put a few drops of blue food dye in a mister, added some water, and spritzed. It worked. It wasn’t as vibrant as I would have liked, but I made the solution super diluted since I wasn’t altogether sure that it wouldn’t turn my daughter blue. I found blue, green, and yellow dyes, so I only made a solution with the blue and the yellow (mixed up, they would have made green anyway). I spritzed away at the bubbles and then called Marguerite in for her bath. It was definitely a fun surprise for her. She spent almost an hour happily spritzing at the bubbles. I’ll make sure to keep this activity in mind the next time I stock up on art supplies. And in case you’re wondering about the baby, Cameron doesn’t care for bubble baths just yet. Maybe he’ll appreciate them more in a few months.

Sour Days: Pack Rat Forced to Declutter

Things around here have been on the sour side lately. I know I was supposed to just post about the sweet stuff, but this is related to the whole blogging endeavor. There was a recent decree to get rid of all the garbage that was accumulating in our pathetically small space, so with reluctance from me and copious tears from Marguerite, we got rid of several Pringles cans that were going to turn into this (although ours would have been a small toy sorter – LPS, My Little Pony, Strawberry Shortcake, Jewel Pets, Lalaloopsy, etc.) or this, a rather pretty (I thought so anyway) fabric kite that I had sewn with my own hands (it was declared, nay doomed, by the declutter villain to remain flightless because of some principle about aerodynamics), the beginnings of a cardboard dollhouse, the beginnings of a recycled mirror using faux wrought iron frame like this, bags of used wrapping paper and gift bags that we’d been slowly recycling (we hadn’t needed to buy gift wrap at all, thanks to that bundle), the black beret I’d bought in Paris (because it wasn’t doing anything except gather dust bunnies), fabric scraps that were going to be used for various crafting and upcycling projects… Aargh, it literally pains me to go through this list so I’ll stop. I could put the mess away, and sometimes, they are properly stored, but the kids usually take some of the materials out, especially Marguerite who’s super imaginative and finds ways to have fun with all kinds of junk, and we all just get so tired of putting them away again that they’re just gathered on some surface until the next time (probably ten minutes from that time) we need them. So good luck to all my future upcycling, recycling, and crafting blog posts; they’ve been thrown out alongside the clutter.

I admit that I do tend to be messy. Growing up, I had maids to pick up after me and until now I’m still learning that all those household chores won’t be magically done for me. When we moved to this space, I curbed my creative recycling compulsion because it would have caused an issue with people who don’t share the same convictions about reducing, recycling and reusing. However, when we started this blog, I thought it was understood that I’d expect certain liberties about crafting materials and recyclables (you know, clutter) because I’d be posting about these projects. Now, I’m clearly disabused of this notion.

I’m unhappy about having been forced to give up the clutter. It makes me wonder about values and sacrifices, when two sets of the former are unsynched and when the latter are made grudgingly. So, in effect, the lesson in waste reduction I was hoping to instill in my kids turned into waste itself and got thrown out with the rest of the “garbage”. Sigh. I’ll probably post this, but I won’t be promoting it in social media.

Look, I’d already taken a picture of the cardboard scraps I’d used for the dollhouse in prep for that blog post. The structure was already built; it was just a matter of decorating and furnishing it. Hopefully, it was found by somebody who’d bother to finish the work.

DSC_2964

Fishy Fun with Pipe Cleaners and Free Printable from Tickled Peach Studio

pipe cleaner fishPipe cleaners are something that I like to keep handy at home for craft projects and general fun. I was looking for activities to entertain my kids with when I came across this idea on a Pinterest board. My daughter has had several several sets of plastic fish with metal studs in their mouth when she was younger. I’m not sure why playing with them always got old right away, but I think it usually had something to do with the magnet in the “bait” getting lost. I was doubtful about the makeshift fish and rod holding an appeal for my daughter, but thankfully they did. She actually spent a lot of time fishing, and then tossing the fish back in. Our 1.5-year-old found the fish fascinating too, but he finds most things interesting anyway. He’s big on tossing the fish back in the fake water. The great thing about the pipe cleaner fish is that they don’t turn into clutter when their novelty wears off. They can be untwisted and returned to their container. They definitely can be used again for some other project or activity. I think we may try making those pipe cleaner finger puppets also featured on the board.

DSC_2963

Tickled Peach Studio is offering a freebie in the form of a cute and clever reward chart. There are actually two options, one featuring cats and the other, dogs. The post also includes tips for using a behavior reward chart. Now, I used to have a weekly chart myself – but much of it was focused on homeschool tasks, so when we decided to ditch worksheets, I stopped with the chart as well. The reward chart from Tickled Peach Studio, incidentally, lists the behavior areas that my daughter usually struggles in, so this is perfect for us. I think parents of small children will really find this chart useful. It has the right items for ticking and is also appealing to kids’ sense of aesthetics. Hopefully, it will inspire the kids to be more mindful of their behavior.

Image grabbed from TickledPeachStudio.com. Click to access free printable.

Image grabbed from TickledPeachStudio.com. Click to access free printable.

Creative Fun with Clothes Pegs

clothes pegs craftThis little crafty trick is something I picked up from Handimania yet again. I make it a point to have a stash of wooden pegs handy since we use them a lot for art, but this was the first time I encountered this particular project. It’s fun in the way pop-up books, puppets, and that chopped-off thumb “magic” trick are fun. This peg craft appealed to both my kids (6.5 and 1.5), and I think even older kids and adults will find it quite entertaining. Seeing that added element peek out elicits a pleasant kind of surprise. Younger kids are apt to play peek-a-boo with it. I’m not the greatest at drawing, but as you can see, I bravely soldiered on. If you’re not particularly skilled at drawing and would rather not bother trying, you could probably use pictures instead.

This is how this craft peg works:

ring and boxegg and birdcupcake and boxshell and pearlfish and wormmushroom and elf

Do you know any other tricks using clothes pegs? What other figures can you draw that would reveal something when you lift up the top part?

Screen-free Week: Unplug Your Kids

Screen-free Week is almost halfway over, but if you haven’t been observing it, there’s still plenty of time to practice being screen-free, or at the very least, considerably unplugged. Being a writer in this age, and a blogger, at that, the most I can do without sacrificing work is to significantly lessen my time in front of the screen. Thankfully, my cell phone gave up the ghost a couple of months back and I have yet to find the motivation to replace it. We also don’t have the usual video games and we’re not getting any ever as long as I have anything to say about it. But we do have a tablet; my daughter uses it for watching movies and playing a few educational games, including taking care of that pet poop-like creature Pou… I can tell that I’m about to go off on an angry tangent about technology since I’m part-Amish and part-Greg Kinnear’s character in You’ve Got Mail, so I’m wrenching myself away from that particular train of thought. In any case, I’m definitely not one to talk since, as much as I disapprove, I do find much practical use in these digital devices, including the tablet, which I mostly use for reading those free ebooks I’ve been hoarding in my Cloud reader.

But if you are interested in the idea behind Screen-free Week, here are some helpful resources for suggestions on alternative activities to do, inspiration for being unplugged, etc.

Screen-free Week Online Resources:

The Slacker’s Guide to Screen-Free Week (activity suggestions divided into Morning, Afternoon, and Evening)

Get Ready for Screen-Free Week: 30 Great Activities and Printables (screen-time statistics, tips for enjoying Screen-free Week better, activity suggestions divided into Fun with Reading, Active Fun, Outdoor Fun, Arts and Crafts, In the Kitchen, Family Time, and Dinner Time Printables)

National Screen-Free Week: A Survival Guide (11 suggestions, plus a link to a Snow Day Survival Guide, which might also apply)

75 Activities for Screen-Free Week (a family’s set of rules for observing Screen-free Week, a downloadable/printable list of suggested activities)

Family Goes Screen-Free, Stays Screen-Free (a mother’s account of how observing Screen-free Week led to generally screen-free kids)

Screen-Free Week: 2012 Recap (I love this post – please take the time to read it. We focus too much on the kids going screen-free that we fail to notice if we’re applying the same principle to ourselves.)

Take the Screen-Free Challenge (lays down research-based premise for diminishing screen-time)

 

How about some ebooks?

Finding Educational Activities in the Most Unexpected Places: 200+ Activities for Young Children Using Common Household Objects

Unplugged Play: No Batteries. No Plugs. Pure Fun.

Beginning Montessori With Infants and Tots Birth to 24 Months

 

Or traditional books?

Goodnight iPad: a Parody for the next generation

The Creative Family: How to Encourage Imagination and Nurture Family Connections

Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children From Nature-Deficit Disorder

 

Sometime during Screen-free Week, we’ll be working on many of the items on our summer 2013 bucket list, one of which is to make lots of fairy houses. Marguerite rediscovered this old favorite going through my other blog. We also have many arts and crafts projects lined up for this week, as well as some activities Marguerite saw on Pinterest (we browse through boards together) and wants to do. Cameron is sure to be a cheerful participant in all these.

fairyhouse

What about you? Are you going to observe Screen-free Week? Do you have your own ideas for making the experience extra special? Please share.

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